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26 minutes ago, go iu bb said:

Also, in the past the coaches had the advantage of being in control of the athletes' ability to transfer. To transfer, the athletes had to get a release from the school (i.e. the coach). Even then the schools could restrict to which schools the athletes could transfer if they wanted to be able to receive a scholarship so it could be a conditional release, in other words. Then the athletes would have to sit out a year. That was probably incentive enough for many athletes to try to tough it out for another year in a toxic program. 

The power has now shifted where the coaches no longer have that type of control. That's a good thing. Toxic coaches won't be able to hold on to athletes as easily.

As good of a coach as Knight was, he probably wouldn't have nearly the same success that he had if the transfer rules were what they are today. Even with what they were he did have his share of transfers, especially later in his time at IU.

As a coach Bob Knight had few, if any, equals; but he crossed the line on multiple occasions.

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1 hour ago, JSHoosier said:

Exactly.  Knowing this crap isn't acceptable and that they shouldn't have to put up with this kind of abuse doesn't make them "mentally weak".

No one should take the abuse Aird has done and in this case it certainly does not make players mentally weak to not put up with it.

With that said people like you that can't acknowledge kids are treated very entitled today are a problem also.

In Aird's case this is not an issue of kids being mentally weak and he is a stone cold abuser. 

However, kids need to be taught to toughen up at times and not run from their problems the second adversity hits.

Both are 100% true.

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14 minutes ago, Aaron said:

No one should take the abuse Aird has done and in this case it certainly does not make players mentally weak to not put up with it.

With that said people like you that can't acknowledge kids are treated very entitled today are a problem also.

In Aird's case this is not an issue of kids being mentally weak and he is a stone cold abuser. 

However, kids need to be taught to toughen up at times and not run from their problems the second adversity hits.

Both are 100% true.

Again, just stop

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Any post that can be summarized as “kids these days” makes me want to stop reading.

People are individuals. Some are entitled; most are not. Always been that way.

Competitive athletes tend to be pretty freakin tough, both physically and mentally.

 

I think it’s a relative fact that the current generation doesn’t handle stresses as well the previous generation. Is the coaching worse (harder, tougher, meaner) now than it was 20-30 years ago?

 

Mental illness, depression, etc, and worse is significantly more prominent now that it was in my generation and my parents generation. The question is why? I’ve got my theories. It’s NEVER the kids fault, and adults should be loving and mature especially when being tough. I’m by NO WAY defending Aird or any abusive coach. My larger point leads to my theories of why mental health is at an all time low. We, as a culture, are failing our kids.

 

Personal aside. I’ve got 3 boys. I’m very demanding. I command their respect. I also show them tons of love. My wife and I sometimes do the good cop bad cop routine, but the kids need to face challenges and overcome them at younger ages and learn to have the confidence that they can overcome life’s challenges. It’s an interesting cultural dynamic because parents want their children to have it better than they had it. Single parent homes. Social media stresses are a gigantic part of it.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using BtownBanners mobile app

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9 hours ago, WayneFleekHoosier said:

I think it’s a relative fact that the current generation doesn’t handle stresses as well the previous generation. Is the coaching worse (harder, tougher, meaner) now than it was 20-30 years ago?

 

Mental illness, depression, etc, and worse is significantly more prominent now that it was in my generation and my parents generation. The question is why? I’ve got my theories. It’s NEVER the kids fault, and adults should be loving and mature especially when being tough. I’m by NO WAY defending Aird or any abusive coach. My larger point leads to my theories of why mental health is at an all time low. We, as a culture, are failing our kids.

 

Personal aside. I’ve got 3 boys. I’m very demanding. I command their respect. I also show them tons of love. My wife and I sometimes do the good cop bad cop routine, but the kids need to face challenges and overcome them at younger ages and learn to have the confidence that they can overcome life’s challenges. It’s an interesting cultural dynamic because parents want their children to have it better than they had it. Single parent homes. Social media stresses are a gigantic part of it.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using BtownBanners mobile app

Helluva good post.

I think another element is that in prior generations people buried their personal crap or drank themselves into numbness far more often. But it was there.

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Helluva good post.
I think another element is that in prior generations people buried their personal crap or drank themselves into numbness far more often.

Thank you, I was trying to be respectful and thoughtful since it’s a very sensitive topic. I think part of what you say is true. No doubt that happened, but drinking is still very prevalent and marijuana use is at all time highs. Yet, mental health problems are stronger than ever. As with most complicated things, the answers are multifactorial. One such factor at play, is BigPharma, in several ways. Pop/rap music programming. Parenting style in so many ways. Social media pressure. Single family homes. The list goes on and on and on.

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10 hours ago, WayneFleekHoosier said:


Thank you, I was trying to be respectful and thoughtful since it’s a very sensitive topic. I think part of what you say is true. No doubt that happened, but drinking is still very prevalent and marijuana use is at all time highs. Yet, mental health problems are stronger than ever. As with most complicated things, the answers are multifactorial. One such factor at play, is BigPharma, in several ways. Pop/rap music programming. Parenting style in so many ways. Social media pressure. Single family homes. The list goes on and on and on.
 

1970's: Oh, what a night Late December back in sixty three What a very special time for me As I remember, what a night
Oh, what a night, you know I didn't even know her name But I was never gonna be the same What a lady, what a night
Oh, I, I got a funny feelin' when she walked in the room And my, as I recall it ended much too soon Oh what a night, hypnotizin' mesmerizing me She was ev'rything I dreamed she'd be Sweet surrender, what a night I felt a rush like a rollin' ball of thunder
Spinnin' my head around and takin' my body under

1950's: It could be a spoonful of coffee it could be a spoonful a-tea But one little spoon Of your precious love Is good enough for me Men lie about that spoonful Some cry about that spoonful Some die about that spoonful Ev'rybody fight about a spoonful That spoon, that spoon That spoonful It could be a spoonful a-water To save you from the desert sand But one spoon of lead From my forty-fiveWill save you from another man

And don't even get me started on 2Live Crew or that filth that came out of Pat Boone's mouth!

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11 minutes ago, Stuhoo said:

1970's: Oh, what a night Late December back in sixty three What a very special time for me As I remember, what a night
Oh, what a night, you know I didn't even know her name But I was never gonna be the same What a lady, what a night
Oh, I, I got a funny feelin' when she walked in the room And my, as I recall it ended much too soon Oh what a night, hypnotizin' mesmerizing me She was ev'rything I dreamed she'd be Sweet surrender, what a night I felt a rush like a rollin' ball of thunder
Spinnin' my head around and takin' my body under

1950's: It could be a spoonful of coffee it could be a spoonful a-tea But one little spoon Of your precious love Is good enough for me Men lie about that spoonful Some cry about that spoonful Some die about that spoonful Ev'rybody fight about a spoonful That spoon, that spoon That spoonful It could be a spoonful a-water To save you from the desert sand But one spoon of lead From my forty-fiveWill save you from another man

And don't even get me started on 2Live Crew or that filth that came out of Pat Boone's mouth!

Just saw Jersey Boys in Bloomington- awesome show!

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17 hours ago, rcs29 said:

Clearly I'm in the minority here but I too think the entitled/guarded young adults today just aren't as mentally tough as the generations before them due to never having to be mentally tough.

I'm really not trying to be argumentative but what makes you think that any other generation had to be mentally tough? Obviously, there are those in every generation tougher than others- we tend to think of Depression era, or WWII era as mentally tougher, but what would have made Boomers or Gen Xers mentally tough? As JSHoosier said, every generation has thought the current young ones are weak/spoiled/morally bankrupt. This generation has been through everything that other generations have, and have dealt with being in school during a pandemic (handling those changes alone makes them pretty tough in my opinion). Again, not trying to argue, just am truly curious to hear the reasoning.

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14 hours ago, WayneFleekHoosier said:

I think it’s a relative fact that the current generation doesn’t handle stresses as well the previous generation. Is the coaching worse (harder, tougher, meaner) now than it was 20-30 years ago?

 

Mental illness, depression, etc, and worse is significantly more prominent now that it was in my generation and my parents generation. The question is why? I’ve got my theories. It’s NEVER the kids fault, and adults should be loving and mature especially when being tough. I’m by NO WAY defending Aird or any abusive coach. My larger point leads to my theories of why mental health is at an all time low. We, as a culture, are failing our kids.

 

Personal aside. I’ve got 3 boys. I’m very demanding. I command their respect. I also show them tons of love. My wife and I sometimes do the good cop bad cop routine, but the kids need to face challenges and overcome them at younger ages and learn to have the confidence that they can overcome life’s challenges. It’s an interesting cultural dynamic because parents want their children to have it better than they had it. Single parent homes. Social media stresses are a gigantic part of it.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using BtownBanners mobile app

I'll call BS on past generations handling stresses any better. People just ignored it and refused to talk about it in the past. I've known multiple people ranging in age from 40s to 80s that have talked about how they were dealing with depression for DECADES, but only recently became comfortable admitting it and seeking help. Suicide rates are up from an all time low in the late 90s/early 00s, but only to about rates seen pretty consistently from the 1950's to the 80's (and it was double those rates pre WWII), and that's when rates were likely much more heavily underreported then compared to now. In the 90's, I knew a kid that was heavily bullied and hanged himself, but the family was absolutely adamant that it was accidental and was never actually ruled a suicide, this type of thing was really common, but there has been a big push in recent years to reduce the stigma in hopes that awareness will get more people to seek help. And something like 25% of the uptick in suicides over the last 20 years can be attributed to military personnel that served in Iraq/Afghanistan.

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2 hours ago, iu eyedoc said:

Agree 100%.

 

That is why, while living in FL about a 1/4 of a mile from my kids school, I have installed a snow machine and hill that I require my boys to walk up hill both to and from school for 2 miles every day on their way to classes.

One of the best posts I've ever seen on here.

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1 hour ago, mamasa said:

I'm really not trying to be argumentative but what makes you think that any other generation had to be mentally tough? Obviously, there are those in every generation tougher than others- we tend to think of Depression era, or WWII era as mentally tougher, but what would have made Boomers or Gen Xers mentally tough? As JSHoosier said, every generation has thought the current young ones are weak/spoiled/morally bankrupt. This generation has been through everything that other generations have, and have dealt with being in school during a pandemic (handling those changes alone makes them pretty tough in my opinion). Again, not trying to argue, just am truly curious to hear the reasoning.

And I wouldn't necessarily say that people in the Depression/WWII were any tougher individually. Depression era had some of the highest suicide rates in recorded history. And collectively, people accomplished some amazing things during WWII, but that's more that there was a clear goal to rally behind.

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20 minutes ago, PB1230 said:

 

I'll call BS on past generations handling stresses any better. People just ignored it and refused to talk about it in the past. I've known multiple people ranging in age from 40s to 80s that have talked about how they were dealing with depression for DECADES, but only recently became comfortable admitting it and seeking help. Suicide rates are up from an all time low in the late 90s/early 00s, but only to about rates seen pretty consistently from the 1950's to the 80's (and it was double those rates pre WWII), and that's when rates were likely much more heavily underreported then compared to now. In the 90's, I knew a kid that was heavily bullied and hanged himself, but the family was absolutely adamant that it was accidental and was never actually ruled a suicide, this type of thing was really common, but there has been a big push in recent years to reduce the stigma in hopes that awareness will get more people to seek help. And something like 25% of the uptick in suicides over the last 20 years can be attributed to military personnel that served in Iraq/Afghanistan.

I know someone that would've been born in the early 60s at latest that once tried arguing that "depression isn't real, you just feel sad".  I sadly wasn't shocked coming from them.

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17 minutes ago, PB1230 said:

And I wouldn't necessarily say that people in the Depression/WWII were any tougher individually. Depression era had some of the highest suicide rates in recorded history. And collectively, people accomplished some amazing things during WWII, but that's more that there was a clear goal to rally behind.

Thank you- you put it better than I did!

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I have no doubt that rates of the diagnosis of mental health issues in athletes and just people in general are up from the past. Some may look at this as kids now being weaker mentally  but the key word there is "diagnosis." Several factors go into why there are more cases diagnosed now than in the past. 

- More understanding of mental health means being better able to identify it than in the past. 

- There is still a stigma associated with having mental health issues but it's not nearly as harsh as in the past and many people are accepting of it. This means that people are more willing to seek treatment and therefore get diagnosed as having a mental health issue. 

- This is in line with the stigma comment above but more athletes and celebrities are open about mental health issues than in the past. This helps reduce the stigma by showing that even successful and/or popular people can have mental health issues. 

So with better diagnosis procedures and people being more will to seek help, it's really no surprise that diagnoses are up. Especially when you look at some of the difficulties kids and young adults have had to go through in their lives that could cause them stress directly or indirectly. Two big ones are the housing crash with the following recession and COVID.

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