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brumdog45

Positive news regarding coronavirus thread

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On 6/5/2020 at 12:01 AM, 8bucks said:


How does the tennis recruiting work? One of my kids has been really progressing and while she is not getting college looks yet she might if she continues. Lost her freshman year so hard to tell where she is in comparison.

I am familiar with HS soccer recruitment and the college ID camps but have not seen much yet for tennis


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My son plays NAIA and there is very little scholarship funding;  team was only in its third year last year (but was doing very well -- think they were 5-1 in the fall season before having the spring season cut off (their spring season is longer and tougher than their fall, but they would have ended up at .500 or so).

Anyway, I was an assistant tennis coach for my son's team (and the girl's team as well) for about three years and we had a girl that ended up on full scholarship at Wayne State.  Wayne State is a really good D2 girl's tennis program (they were 17-4 last year before their season was cut short and had already qualified for the D2 national tournament) -- she is 33-9 in two seasons primarily playing the #5 spot.  Anyway, she was the #7 ranked senior (I believe) in Indiana and somewhere around 450 nationally in her class.  One thing to keep in mind is that many of the best players will not play in college -- some even won't play high school.  D1 players typically are getting recruited based on their USTA performance, not their high school seasons.  USTA rankings seem to be big.....I think players that aren't playing USTA tournaments are really going to get D1 looks.  My son was not a USTA player -- he was a kid who really didn't start playing seriously until his sophomore year;  he went from the worst kid on the team at the beginning of his freshman year, grew 8 inches and became a varsity player at doubles as a sophomore, #1 doubles players on a team that qualified for regional as a junior, and then was the #1 singles player as a senior.  He really wasn't looking to play college tennis as he was looking at going into construction until his senior year when he decided he wanted to go into education. In his case, he contacted the coach at IUSB and set up a time to meet him and practice a little -- coach told him that he couldn't guarantee him anything, but he thought that from what he had seen that he would be able to play there.  He's played about half the varsity matches as a freshmen and every match this year.  Long story short (too late, I know), is that outside of D1/high D2 scholarship situations, I would say it is best to have the player and/or parents contact coaches and express interest.  Doesn't hurt to have coaches advocate, either.  Most tennis programs outside of major ones are on very, very limited budgets.  Very little given in terms of scholarships and recruiting budgets are very small.

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My son plays NAIA and there is very little scholarship funding;  team was only in its third year last year (but was doing very well -- think they were 5-1 in the fall season before having the spring season cut off (their spring season is longer and tougher than their fall, but they would have ended up at .500 or so).
Anyway, I was an assistant tennis coach for my son's team (and the girl's team as well) for about three years and we had a girl that ended up on full scholarship at Wayne State.  Wayne State is a really good D2 girl's tennis program (they were 17-4 last year before their season was cut short and had already qualified for the D2 national tournament) -- she is 33-9 in two seasons primarily playing the #5 spot.  Anyway, she was the #7 ranked senior (I believe) in Indiana and somewhere around 450 nationally in her class.  One thing to keep in mind is that many of the best players will not play in college -- some even won't play high school.  D1 players typically are getting recruited based on their USTA performance, not their high school seasons.  USTA rankings seem to be big.....I think players that aren't playing USTA tournaments are really going to get D1 looks.  My son was not a USTA player -- he was a kid who really didn't start playing seriously until his sophomore year;  he went from the worst kid on the team at the beginning of his freshman year, grew 8 inches and became a varsity player at doubles as a sophomore, #1 doubles players on a team that qualified for regional as a junior, and then was the #1 singles player as a senior.  He really wasn't looking to play college tennis as he was looking at going into construction until his senior year when he decided he wanted to go into education. In his case, he contacted the coach at IUSB and set up a time to meet him and practice a little -- coach told him that he couldn't guarantee him anything, but he thought that from what he had seen that he would be able to play there.  He's played about half the varsity matches as a freshmen and every match this year.  Long story short (too late, I know), is that outside of D1/high D2 scholarship situations, I would say it is best to have the player and/or parents contact coaches and express interest.  Doesn't hurt to have coaches advocate, either.  Most tennis programs outside of major ones are on very, very limited budgets.  Very little given in terms of scholarships and recruiting budgets are very small.

Glad your son found a path to play. My daughter also started to play later than most of the girls but loves to train and practice. So far she has not enjoyed tournaments and has not done anything to build a NTSA ranking.

She plays soccer at a pretty high level currently and that could limit time to play HS tennis but perhaps if she wants to play in college she might be able to fit NTSA tournaments in easier.

Thanks for the info.


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Moderators:  if you feel this is a political post, please delete it.  I really don't think it is -- IMO, it's one of trying to be positive about the situation 

Been a long time since I posted here. Again, looking for positives.

The school I teach at ending up pushing back our start date 10 days to get better prepared.  We're a district with an above normal rate of covid spread for Indiana.  We will open in person, five days a week.  We initially were going to go all virtual as the percentage of students that were to come in person was around 75% and, simply put, we could not get enough spacing to safely house our students.  Our district was set to go to all virtual in what was going to be a very contentious board meeting.  We re-examined and at the board meeting the facts were laid out, stating how high the rates were and what it would take space wise to safely open.  We pushed back the start of school and parents were asked to look at the current data and evaluate what they wished to do (it had been a month since they had initially been asked).  If the numbers allowed it, we would go to five day in person;  if not, we would go with a hybrid where students were there half the time.

After re-evaluating options, 56% now chose in person.  This will allow us to have full in person five day teaching with proper spacing.  Our district, despite being lower middle class, has always been committed to technology and we upped our system to include Newline boards so that students at home can view the lessons in real time.

So the big positive:  through careful planning and despite it looking like there was a community breakdown initially, it does look like information was received and parents made the decision that was best for them to allow us to hopefully serve everyone as best we can safely.

 

As a teacher, BELIEVE ME when I say I know how hard it was for parents to make decisions on what they feel is best.  And while there are certainly some bad eggs -- just like every profession -- although stressed and uncertain, teachers are empathetic with what students and parents are going through.  I am hopeful that the vast majority of parents know that there are going to be a lot of bumps along the road -- both in technology at times as well as times where covid cases will have to be dealt with in order to keep the school population safe.  My hope is that we will see at the local levels around the state communities coming together to do what we need to either keep schools open because they are not a source of high spread or in places where schools have opened virtually, local communities are able to do what is necessary to see the cases get to a point where they can get the school open. 

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Moderators:  if you feel this is a political post, please delete it.  I really don't think it is -- IMO, it's one of trying to be positive about the situation 
Been a long time since I posted here. Again, looking for positives.
The school I teach at ending up pushing back our start date 10 days to get better prepared.  We're a district with an above normal rate of covid spread for Indiana.  We will open in person, five days a week.  We initially were going to go all virtual as the percentage of students that were to come in person was around 75% and, simply put, we could not get enough spacing to safely house our students.  Our district was set to go to all virtual in what was going to be a very contentious board meeting.  We re-examined and at the board meeting the facts were laid out, stating how high the rates were and what it would take space wise to safely open.  We pushed back the start of school and parents were asked to look at the current data and evaluate what they wished to do (it had been a month since they had initially been asked).  If the numbers allowed it, we would go to five day in person;  if not, we would go with a hybrid where students were there half the time.
After re-evaluating options, 56% now chose in person.  This will allow us to have full in person five day teaching with proper spacing.  Our district, despite being lower middle class, has always been committed to technology and we upped our system to include Newline boards so that students at home can view the lessons in real time.
So the big positive:  through careful planning and despite it looking like there was a community breakdown initially, it does look like information was received and parents made the decision that was best for them to allow us to hopefully serve everyone as best we can safely.
 
As a teacher, BELIEVE ME when I say I know how hard it was for parents to make decisions on what they feel is best.  And while there are certainly some bad eggs -- just like every profession -- although stressed and uncertain, teachers are empathetic with what students and parents are going through.  I am hopeful that the vast majority of parents know that there are going to be a lot of bumps along the road -- both in technology at times as well as times where covid cases will have to be dealt with in order to keep the school population safe.  My hope is that we will see at the local levels around the state communities coming together to do what we need to either keep schools open because they are not a source of high spread or in places where schools have opened virtually, local communities are able to do what is necessary to see the cases get to a point where they can get the school open. 
The school my wife teaches at started in person two weeks ago and they are sending tons of kids home every day.

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There is so much more to school these days that simply the 3Rs. I read this week where about 70% of the social services assistance kids get is administered through schools.

Couple that with teen suicide rates being up again and I understand how important it is to have kids in schools.

It is good to hear though that your school has the technology to deliver a strong product for those who need to stay home.

Our schools started about 10 days ago and there are kids that had been at school now at home. Some schools have cases but for each case you get, the schools here typically quarantine those who sat near them as well. Technology helps those kids who toggle back and forth as well.

Glad to hear your community has found a path to start with. My son and wife work in Elementary schools and I hear daily how things are going with them. It is not easy and some days are more difficult than others but both seem to be settling into a groove now.


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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency authorization on Saturday allowing public use of a saliva-based test for the coronavirus developed at Yale University and funded by the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association.

https://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/29667299/fda-allowing-saliva-based-test-funded-nba

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On 8/15/2020 at 9:01 AM, maharkn said:

The school my wife teaches at started in person two weeks ago and they are sending tons of kids home every day.

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Are you able to provide some numbers please?  I ask because I've heard a similar statement from someone else and without actual figures, the school would be 100% virtual at this point.  Tons of kids is quite arbitrary.  So 50 kids a day?  100 kids a day?  Not trying to start anything, just making the point that numbers would help to better understand the situation.

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Are you able to provide some numbers please?  I ask because I've heard a similar statement from someone else and without actual figures, the school would be 100% virtual at this point.  Tons of kids is quite arbitrary.  So 50 kids a day?  100 kids a day?  Not trying to start anything, just making the point that numbers would help to better understand the situation.

For our schools, according to my wife and kids, there are kids who test positive who obviously stay home but any kids who were in contact, like those whose desk is next to the kid who tested positive, now have to stay home for 14 days as well. So 1 positive test could send 9 kids in total home. Usually the contact numbers are a smaller than 9.

My daughter had a friend who was tested and had she tested positive then my daughter might have been amongst the others sent home.

Also keep in mind normal back to school colds/illnesses are in play too. My wife always ends up with some cold the first few weeks of a new school year. This year she has been spared so far.

I think in our district we may have had a handful of positive tests amongst several schools but I could see where a lot of kids who are not sick with Covid are staying home temporarily too.


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2 hours ago, Naturalhoosier said:

Are you able to provide some numbers please?  I ask because I've heard a similar statement from someone else and without actual figures, the school would be 100% virtual at this point.  Tons of kids is quite arbitrary.  So 50 kids a day?  100 kids a day?  Not trying to start anything, just making the point that numbers would help to better understand the situation.

Hey Natty, I know in Huntington we have had two kids in the first week week that we know tested positive and they have quarantined not quite 100 kids in the first week.  With that, we had a bunch of kids get opted out.  Ours were 4th graders are Roanoke and Horace Mann.  We had other incidents where kids are quarantining until test results not associated with positive tests yet. 

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Here is a good story on how Brownsburg has been impacted. Of note, there were about 67 students who had exposure to someone who tested positive and none of these students showed any symptoms or tested positive.

Good to see how they have been able to manage around the virus and still keep kids in school.


https://www.wrtv.com/news/coronavirus/covid-19-education/covid-19-numbers-heres-what-one-large-suburban-school-district-is-reporting


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1 hour ago, 8bucks said:


We are 6 weeks in and have only had 2 cases at the HS.


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6 weeks in.  1 teacher. 1 lunch lady, 1 student. across 3 separate large schools, k-12.  All back to school, no complications.  
 

Yet many school systems aren’t in session. 

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Back in July we needed to get my daughter tested for covid and the earliest appointment they would give her was 8 days later with 4 to 6 more days to get the results.  Useless.  My son had to get tested to return to work as he was sick Monday.  Got tested Tuesday morning and received the results Wednesday afternoon.  He’ll of a lot better.

oh, he was negative.

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What necessitates being contact-traced in your school district?

Our school district is 15 min of contact at 6 ft or less with no mask.  I don't even get that much time with my wife.

We have had 3 sets of 2 cases each.  At least one case in each level of school.  No information on how many were quarantined, tested, or even called.

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What necessitates being contact-traced in your school district?
Our school district is 15 min of contact at 6 ft or less with no mask.  I don't even get that much time with my wife.
We have had 3 sets of 2 cases each.  At least one case in each level of school.  No information on how many were quarantined, tested, or even called.
Not sure what it is in school. I know my niece in another district was quarantined because the kid she sits next to tested positive. I believe most Districts in our area have that same policy. Most of our kids and teachers who have been quarantined was because a family member has it.

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