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Milldawg12

Sean Miller caught on phone

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From ESPN to Pro Football Talk, sports are being destroyed by a barrage of bad news; some of it being premature, some of it inaccurate, and some of it outright lies. Adding to that nasty mess is the win at all cost attitude of some universities, coaches and alumni. Is it any wonder that college sports is becoming less and less watchable? I don't know where the answers lie, but I don't think it is in paying collegiate players. More likely, it's in creating an NBA farm system, (NBA, since we're talking about college basketball) that pays those talents willing to forego an education for the chance, (no matter how small) at stardom, and a big payday. For those who want an education, and something to fall back on in the event their skills and talent don't translate to the professional league, I'd propose making athletic scholarships contingent upon the recipient agreeing to play a minimum of two years, and possibly three, with the proviso that leaving any earlier will result in their reimbursing the university in full for the complete value of goods and services provided during their stay. If they complete all four years and graduate, no payback in required. Half baked idea perhaps, but it sounds fair to me.

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To be fair, ESPN really didnt have any credibility before this.

I was watching live when they announced he was fired. I told my son about it, then they never followed it up and started just listing the "facts" of the case.

Somebody really dropped the ball on that one. Wonder what happened behind the scenes for them to announce he was fired.


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From ESPN to Pro Football Talk, sports are being destroyed by a barrage of bad news; some of it being premature, some of it inaccurate, and some of it outright lies. Adding to that nasty mess is the win at all cost attitude of some universities, coaches and alumni. Is it any wonder that college sports is becoming less and less watchable? I don't know where the answers lie, but I don't think it is in paying collegiate players. More likely, it's in creating an NBA farm system, (NBA, since we're talking about college basketball) that pays those talents willing to forego an education for the chance, (no matter how small) at stardom, and a big payday. For those who want an education, and something to fall back on in the event their skills and talent don't translate to the professional league, I'd propose making athletic scholarships contingent upon the recipient agreeing to play a minimum of two years, and possibly three, with the proviso that leaving any earlier will result in their reimbursing the university in full for the complete value of goods and services provided during their stay. If they complete all four years and graduate, no payback in required. Half baked idea perhaps, but it sounds fair to me.

I like that idea except for the paying back tuition part. You either go to nba or nba farm league or go to college for 3 yrs.

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12 hours ago, TrueHoosier62 said:

From ESPN to Pro Football Talk, sports are being destroyed by a barrage of bad news; some of it being premature, some of it inaccurate, and some of it outright lies. 

Social media, myriad websites on internet, TV crawls have all added to this. It's almost as if it's become more important to be first than to be correct. Everybody's so eager to get something out there, they don't seem to even care if it's accurate -- or important. ... Back in 2008, when there was just one NCAA tourney play-in game, Coppin State won the MEAC tournament, but had a losing record. First of all, it was the MEAC, which typically has the lowest, or one of the lowest, conference RPIs in the country. Second of all, it was the only team with a losing record that could make the field. Yet about two minutes before CBS was to air its selection show, ESPN had this crawl: "BREAKING NEWS! ESPN's Andy Katz reports that Coppin State will be in the play-in game on Tuesday night."... Honestly, that happened. My 7-year old mutt could've figured out that Coppin State was gonna be in that game. But ESPN, for some reason, felt the need to let everyone know just before the selection show. 

Also, here's this fun tidbit from a few years back about Bret Bielema and Notre Dame. It's from a Notre Dame fan board: 

 

Here's an object lesson in how rumors get started, and how quickly they spread in the internet age.

1. Friend of BGS decides (not at our behest, by the way) to email the rumor site FootballCoachScoop.com with a choice tidbit. FootballCoachScoop seems to post all kinds of unsubstantiated rumors, and said friend wants to see how easy it is to get something started.

2. Friend composes a very short, but specific email: I used to work in the athletic department at Notre Dame(a lie), and I have heard that Jack Swarbrick is interested in Bret Bielema, the head coach at the University of Wisconsin. This was at 6:56pm last evening. The email is sent from a free gmail account. There is no other email sent from friend, no attempt to "sell" the rumor beyond the initial communication, and nothing else to back up his credibility.

3. Meanwhile, friend has another buddy randomly tweet a few times about the Bielema rumors, and goes to bed.

4. FootballCoachScoop does not reply to the email. FootballCoachScoop does not ask any followup questions. FootballCoachScoop, to friend's knowledge, makes no attempt to verify emailer's bona fides in any way.

5. The next morning, FootballCoachScoop runs the rumor almost verbatim. Friend chuckles and shares the development with a few friends.

6. Later in the day, BGS notices a piece posted to "the Examiner", a Huffington Post-style blogging site that allows anyone with an email address to register as a "reporter." Joshua Burns picks up on the FootballScoop item and pens this:

Notre Dame AD to talk with Wisconsin head coach Bret Bielema this weekend
December 4, 2:15 PM Cincinnati Bearcats Examiner Joshua Burns

Another day, another new name has surfaced in the Notre Dame head coaching search.

According to FootballCoachScoop.com, Irish AD Jack Swarbrick is "very interested" in talking to Wisconsin head coach Bret Bielema, after the Badgers trip from Hawaii this weekend.

Bielema's name has not been mentioned in prior discussions about the Notre Dame opening. He joins a list of reported candidates that includes Jim Harbaugh (Stanford), Skip Holtz (ECU), Randy Edsall (UConn), and Brian Kelly (Cincinnati).

Bielema was an assistant coach at the University of Iowa from 1993 to 2001. He then became the co-defensive coordinator for Kansas State University from 2002 to 2003. He took the same position at the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 2004.

The Wisconsin coach joins a chaotic rumer mill surrounding the Irish head coaching void left by the firing of Charlie Weis. Most expect answers to many of the questions surrounding the search after this weekend, the last regular-season weekend before bowl games begin.

"Examiner" posts have sometimes popped up in my google reader, linked alongside legitimate news stories from legitimate news outlets. I wonder if it will show up. 

UPDATE: voilà, there it is. This is now on a national newswire.

In the meantime, please know that to our knowledge, there is absolutely no truth to the rumor that Jack Swarbrick is in any way interested in Bret Bielema as the next coach for Notre Dame.

And please, most of all...don't trust the internet!

UPDATE II: John Taylor, blogging for NBCsports.com, picked up the rumor from FootballCoachScoop, but then realized it was a goof, and printed a pretty entertaining retraction.

UPDATE III: This is officially hilarious. A Madison.com reporter, Jim Polzin, picked up the FootballCoachScoop rumor and actually tracked down Bielema in Hawaii for a statement. He also called Wisconsin athletic director Barry Alvarez. Both men, of course, had no idea what Polzin was talking about and denied any contact between Notre Dame and themselves.

UPDATE IV: Polzin catches on, and updates his story with a link to this post. In the meantime, ESPN blogger Adam Rittenberg has also published the rumor but quickly retracted it.

Okay, enough rumor-busting for the evening. Have a great weekend, everyone.

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28 minutes ago, cljones1979 said:


I like that idea except for the paying back tuition part. You either go to nba or nba farm league or go to college for 3 yrs.

Sent from my SM-G955U using BtownBanners mobile app
 

Strictly out of curiosity, why are you opposed to having student athletes, who default on what might be considered a contractual agreement with the university, pay back their tuition?

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1 hour ago, TrueHoosier62 said:

Strictly out of curiosity, why are you opposed to having student athletes, who default on what might be considered a contractual agreement with the university, pay back their tuition?

I think, correct me if I'm wrong cljones, that he was anti "pay back the scholarship if you leave after year 1 or 2 years..." and just wanted a strict  "at least 3 years or don't go to college" policy

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1 hour ago, HoosierHoops1 said:

I think, correct me if I'm wrong cljones, that he was anti "pay back the scholarship if you leave after year 1 or 2 years..." and just wanted a strict  "at least 3 years or don't go to college" policy

I see. My brain doesn't work as well as it used to. Anyone want to guess what Bob Knight might say about the current state of affairs? :-)

 

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7 minutes ago, AZ Hoosier said:

"When my life is over, and my time on earth has passed..." :D

If my primary purpose here at Indiana is to go out and win ballgames, I can probably do that as well as anybody can. I would just cheat, get some money from a lot of people around Indianapolis who want to run the operation that way, and just go out and get the best basketball players I can. Then we'd beat everybody." 

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7 hours ago, TrueHoosier62 said:

Strictly out of curiosity, why are you opposed to having student athletes, who default on what might be considered a contractual agreement with the university, pay back their tuition?

I think enforcement of this would end up being almost impossible. 

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14 minutes ago, jonz44 said:

I think enforcement of this would end up being almost impossible. 

Admittedly, the idea was something that that just crossed my mind; hadn't really worked out all the details. Still, I think conceptually,  the idea of tying tuition to a contract of say, three years, merits further fleshing out. 

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17 minutes ago, TrueHoosier62 said:

Admittedly, the idea was something that that just crossed my mind; hadn't really worked out all the details. Still, I think conceptually,  the idea of tying tuition to a contract of say, three years, merits further fleshing out. 

I'm not saying I disagree with you. I'm just not sure that it could be enforced. I like the model that baseball uses which is very similar to what you're proposing. MLB has a much better developed farm system than the NBA though and I'd say that's somewhat by design on the NBA's. Saves them quite a large expense. 

I believe I read that Bryce Harper quit high school, obtained his GED, then went to a JUCO at the age of 17. I believe that after one year of JUCO he went to the MLB draft. It allowed him to get collegiate experience but enter the draft at 18. I've wondered before if any high school basketball players have considered this tactic. 

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Admittedly, the idea was something that that just crossed my mind; hadn't really worked out all the details. Still, I think conceptually,  the idea of tying tuition to a contract of say, three years, merits further fleshing out. 


I’m not sure how it works exactly but at that point wouldn’t they officially be under contract (unlike academic scholarships) which wouldn’t make them “amateurs”. Not trying to poke holes in what you’re saying I’m legitimately asking because I don’t know.

I'm not saying I disagree with you. I'm just not sure that it could be enforced. I like the model that baseball uses which is very similar to what you're proposing. MLB has a much better developed farm system than the NBA though and I'd say that's somewhat by design on the NBA's. Saves them quite a large expense. 
I believe I read that Bryce Harper quit high school, obtained his GED, then went to a JUCO at the age of 17. I believe that after one year of JUCO he went to the MLB draft. It allowed him to get collegiate experience but enter the draft at 18. I've wondered before if any high school basketball players have considered this tactic. 


Jeremy Tyler did it and failed miserably.

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